Challenges to the 2006 Guidelines

Challenges to the 2006 Guidelines

Many critics of the 2006 Lyme treatment guidelines have long raised concerns over the initial development of these guidelines, and Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal challenged the society to answer the point that a number authors were said to have “undisclosed conflicts of interest” (thought to include financial stakes in Lyme disease related commercial industries), which could have influenced their findings. 

 

The report released on 22 April 2010 sought to address some of these concerns and Blumenthal issued a statement assuring those concerned that his office was reviewing the findings in detail and would determine if the IDSA had ‘fulfilled the requirements of our settlement’.Lyme Disease Association have reported that an estimated 15-20% of all Lyme victims will go on to develop a chronic form of the disease. This may seem high when one thinks about it but when you start looking it in detail this is the approximate level of  ases of people that suffer from Lyme disease in the long term, and although the review panel chairwoman Dr. Carol J. Baker assured patients that the panel members had “tremendous compassion” those victims who said they had chronic cases, all of the members were concerned about the safety and cost issues of prescribing extended antibiotic therapy, and stated that “We don’t want our patients to be exposed to those kinds of risks when there was no credible medical or scientific evidence that these kinds of therapies improved their illness”.

Dr Cameron also pointed out that the report from the panel would be just another excuse for health insurers to refuse to pay out for those patients that needed ongoing medical support for Lyme disease, and is keen to reassure patients that doctors will continue to support those that suffer from chronic Lyme related problems and offer ongoing treatment.